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Explainer: What are AI PCs? How do they differ from traditional PC?

Explainer: What are AI PCs? How do they differ from traditional PC?

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Explainer: What are AI PCs? How do they differ from traditional PC?

The PC just got an AI makeover, raising hopes that the buzzy technology would help revive an industry that has been on a steady decline over the last few years.

Here’s everything we know about AI PCs:

WHAT DOES “AI PC” MEAN?

Manufacturers say these devices process data more swiftly than traditional PCs and can handle a greater volume of AI tasks directly on the device, including chatbots.

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That means they do not have to rely on cloud data centers that currently power most AI applications, including OpenAI’s ChatGPT.

Some models can even support the training of AI models, a task that requires significant computing power and is typically performed on servers.

PC makers are hoping such features will help draw in buyers as more people lean on generative AI for everything from sending emails to planning vacations.

Research firm Canalys estimates AI PC shipments will surpass 100 million in 2025, constituting 40% of all PCs shipped. 

WHAT TECHNOLOGY IS USED IN AI PCS?

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AI PCs come with specialized processors called neural processing units (NPUs) that handle the majority of on-device AI workloads.

These NPUs work in tandem with central processing units and graphics processors to manage complex tasks, deliver enhanced processing speeds and power applications such as AI assistants.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE AI PCS AVAILABLE ON THE MARKET?

Brands including Dell, HP, Samsung Electronics, Lenovo, Asus and Acer have unveiled new computers under Microsoft’s Copilot+ branding, which was announced on Monday.

Among these, Microsoft’s refreshed Surface Laptop and Surface Pro tablet are some of the most affordable Copilot+ devices, starting at $999.

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Lenovo ThinkPad T14s Gen 6, expected to start at $1,699, stands as the priciest option based on the pricing disclosed by some manufacturers.

ARE THERE ANY CONCERNS?

A new flagship feature from Microsoft called “recall” has raised some privacy concerns. The Windows maker’s Copilot+ PCs “recall” capability within the AI assistant allows it to search and retrieve information on any past activity on the computer.

The recall feature tracks every action performed on the laptop from voice chats to web browsing, and creates a detailed history stored on the device. The user can then search this repository and go through past actions.

Some social media users have expressed fears that the feature could enable spying, while billionaire technologist Elon Musk compared it to “Black Mirror,” the Netflix series that explores the harmful effects of advanced technology.

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The main concern with the feature is whether the data is stored on the device or centrally, International Data Corp analyst Ryan O’Leary said, adding that there would be “significant privacy risk” if Microsoft stored the data.

On the other hand, some experts say that managing more AI-related tasks directly on the device offers greater privacy.

Research from Forrester showed AI PCs could help avoid the use of personal data to train AI systems, as well as copyright and patent violations, making them preferable for enterprise use.

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ByteDance confirms layoff plan at its Indonesian unit

ByteDance confirms layoff plan at its Indonesian unit

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ByteDance confirms layoff plan at its Indonesian unit

China’s ByteDance will lay off staff at its Indonesian unit following a deal where it bought a local e-commerce firm and combined it with its TikTok operation, a spokesperson said on Friday.

ByteDance, the owner of TikTok, did not say how many employees would be affected. Bloomberg had earlier reported there would be 450 jobs cut.

In January ByteDance completed a deal to buy a majority stake in Tokopedia, an Indonesian e-commerce firm, from the GoTo group.

ByteDance spokesperson Nuraini Razak told Reuters in a statement the company would “make necessary adjustments” as a result of the combination of TikTok and Tokopedia.

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“We identified areas to strengthen our organisation and better align our teams with company goals,” she said, adding the company would “aim to support employees throughout this transition”.

ByteDance had its own e-commerce operation in Indonesia via its TikTok app, but that was banned under an Indonesian rule that social media applications could not operate as an e-commerce platform.

Tokopedia is one of the leading e-commerce platforms in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.

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Indonesia minister threatens to shut down X over adult content

Indonesia minister threatens to shut down X over adult content

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Indonesia minister threatens to shut down X over adult content

Indonesia is prepared to shut down social media platform X if it does not comply with a regulation barring adult content, the country’s communications minister said on Friday. Indonesia, the world’s biggest Muslim-majority country, has strict rules that ban the sharing online of content deemed obscene.

Minister Budi Arie Setiadi told Reuters he had sent a warning letter to X related to this matter.

“We will certainly shut its services down,” he said, pointing to Indonesia’s electronic information and transaction (ITE) law that can carry a six-year jail sentence if someone spreads pornographic content.

His comments in an interview come after the social media platform recently updated its policies to permit consensually produced adult content.

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X, owned by billionaire Elon Musk, has not responded to Indonesia’s warning letter, Budi said, adding the government would send more letters before deciding on a potential closure.

X, formerly known as Twitter, did not immediately respond to a request by Reuters for comment.

Indonesians are big users of social media and X has 24.85 million users in the country, according to data gathering business Statista.

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Japan watchdog recommends action on MUFG units over sharing of client data

Japan watchdog recommends action on MUFG units over sharing of client data

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Japan's securities watchdog recommended on Friday that the banking and securities units of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group opens new tab (MUFG) be penalised for what it said was unauthorised sharing of client information. The Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission (SESC) made the recommendation to the banking regulator, the Financial Services Agency (FSA), which hands out such punishments in Japan. The recommendation, which was widely expected, followed the SESC's investigation into MUFG's banking arm, MUFG Bank, and its two brokerage ventures with Morgan Stanley (MS.N), opens new tab. The investigation found that confidential client information had been shared between MUFG Bank and one of the two securities firms on at least 26 occasions between 2020 and 2023. MUFG Bank also illegally offered preferential lending rates to clients that did business with the group's two securities brokerages, the SESC said. Japan's "firewall" regulations prohibit banks and securities companies in the same group from sharing customer data with one another without the customer's consent. The investigation found no evidence of insider trading, but monitoring and internal controls were lacking, the SESC said. MUFG group companies will make every effort to strengthen control systems in light of the recommendation and will take measures to prevent recurrence, the parent company said in a statement. The two brokerages were established in 2010, two years after MUFG invested in Morgan Stanley at the height of the global financial crisis in 2008. MUFG owned around 23% of Morgan Stanley as of March 2024.

Japan’s securities watchdog recommended on Friday that the banking and securities units of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group  opens new tab (MUFG) be penalised for what it said was unauthorised sharing of client information.

The Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission (SESC) made the recommendation to the banking regulator, the Financial Services Agency (FSA), which hands out such punishments in Japan.

The recommendation, which was widely expected, followed the SESC’s investigation into MUFG’s banking arm, MUFG Bank, and its two brokerage ventures with Morgan Stanley (MS.N), opens new tab.

The investigation found that confidential client information had been shared between MUFG Bank and one of the two securities firms on at least 26 occasions between 2020 and 2023.

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MUFG Bank also illegally offered preferential lending rates to clients that did business with the group’s two securities brokerages, the SESC said.

Japan’s “firewall” regulations prohibit banks and securities companies in the same group from sharing customer data with one another without the customer’s consent.

The investigation found no evidence of insider trading, but monitoring and internal controls were lacking, the SESC said.

MUFG group companies will make every effort to strengthen control systems in light of the recommendation and will take measures to prevent recurrence, the parent company said in a statement.

The two brokerages were established in 2010, two years after MUFG invested in Morgan Stanley at the height of the global financial crisis in 2008. MUFG owned around 23% of Morgan Stanley as of March 2024.

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