Connect with us

Tech

TSA unveils passenger self-screening lanes at Vegas airport as ‘a step into the future’

TSA unveils passenger self-screening lanes at Vegas airport as ‘a step into the future’

Published

on

TSA unveils passenger self-screening lanes at Vegas airport as 'a step into the future'

 Federal airport security officials unveiled passenger self-screening lanes Wednesday at busy Harry Reid International Airport in Las Vegas, with plans to test it for use in other cities around the country.

“How do we step into the future? This is a step,” said a system designer, Dimitri Kusnezov, science and technology under secretary at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. “The interface with people makes all the difference.”

The Transportation Security Administration checkpoint, initially only in Las Vegas, only for TSA PreCheck customers and only using the English language incorporates a screen with do-it-yourself instructions telling people how to smoothly pass themselves and their carry-on luggage through pre-flight screening with little or no help from uniformed TSA officers.

“We want to avoid passengers having to be patted down,” said John Fortune, program manager of the Department of Homeland Security’s “Screening at Speed” program and a developer with Kusnezov of the prototype.

Advertisement

Instead of a boxy belt-fed device using a stack of gray trays, the futuristic-looking baggage and personal belongings inspection system looks like a scaled-down starship medical magnetic resonance imaging machine. It uses an automated bin return that sanitizes trays with germ-killing ultraviolet light between users.

Travelers step into a separate clear glass body scanning booth with a video display inside showing how to stand when being sensed with what officials said is the type of “millimeter wave technology” already in use around the country.

A reporter found it sensitive enough to identify a forgotten handkerchief in a pocket. He did not have to remove his shoes.

“Really, one of the main aims here is to allow individuals to get through the system without necessarily having to interact directly with an officer and … at their own pace,” said Christina Peach, a TSA administrator involved in the system design. “It’s also about not feeling rushed.”

Nationally, nearly all passengers who pay to enroll in the TSA PreCheck program pass through screening in 10 minutes or less, agency spokesman R. Carter Langston said, while regular traveler and carry-on screening takes about 30 minutes.

Advertisement

Peach said eight uniformed TSA officers might be needed to staff two lanes of the new system, compared with 12 officers in lanes today.

However, Kusnezov and Karen Burke, TSA federal security director in Nevada, said agents including union members would just be freed from hands-on screening to focus more attention on broader security concerns.

“No one is going to lose their job,” Burke said.

Fortune declined to estimate the cost of designing the system, but he said the type of scanners used were similar to ones already deployed around the country. Officials said they’ll time how quickly travelers pass through the prototype during evaluations this year.

Testing is being done at a unique-in-the-nation “innovation checkpoint” that TSA unveiled in 2019 in a sprawling international arrivals terminal that opened in 2012 at Harry Reid airport. It already features screening lanes with instruction displays and estimated wait times.

Advertisement

“This change in technology is for people who want to get through a checkpoint faster,” said Keith Jeffries, a former TSA director at Los Angeles International Airport and now vice president of K2 Security Screening Group, a company that installs screening systems at shipping ports including airports. “It’ll be a great step, but I anticipate it will be for the experienced passengers.”

Jeffries, in an interview on Tuesday with The Associated Press, compared the new system to self-checkout lanes that were introduced in the 1980s and are now common at supermarkets across the nation. He recalled that some shoppers initially avoided scanning their own purchases.

“It’s going to take time to educate the public,” he said of the TSA screening lanes. “You’re going to have a new generation of travelers that just wants to get through with the least amount of hassle and delay. I think eventually we’ll see more and more of them.”

Harry Reid International Airport was the seventh-busiest passenger airport in the U.S. in 2022, ranked by Airports Council International behind New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport. In 2023, the Las Vegas airport handled a new record of 57.6 million arriving and departing passengers.

The Transportation Security Administration reported its busiest day ever at the airport last month, screening nearly 104,000 travelers and their luggage as they headed for airline flights Feb. 12, the day after the NFL Super Bowl was played at Allegiant Stadium.

Advertisement

Tech

Sam Altman’s OpenAI signs content agreement with News Corp

Sam Altman’s OpenAI signs content agreement with News Corp

Published

on

By

Sam Altman's OpenAI signs content agreement with News Corp

Sam Altman-led OpenAI has signed a deal that will give it access to content from some of the biggest news publications owned by media conglomerate News Corp, the companies said on Wednesday.

The deal comes weeks after the Microsoft-backed AI giant clinched an agreement to license content from the Financial Times for the development of AI models.

Access to troves of data can help enhance content produced by OpenAI’s ChatGPT, the chatbot that can generate human-like responses to prompts and create summaries of long text. 

Such partnerships are also crucial for the training of AI models and can be lucrative for news publishers, which have traditionally been denied a slice of profits internet giants earn for distributing their content.

Advertisement

OpenAI, which kickstarted the AI frenzy when it launched its chatbot in 2022, had also struck a content deal with social media platform Reddit last week.

OpenAI did not disclose the financial details of its latest deal, but the Wall Street Journal, which is owned by News Corp, reported that it could be worth more than $250 million over five years.

The tie-up also includes a guarantee that the content will not become available on ChatGPT immediately after it is published on one of the news websites, the WSJ report said.

The agreement will give OpenAI access to current and archived content from several News Corp publications, including the Wall Street Journal, MarketWatch, the Times and others.

News Corp shares climbed about 4% after the bell.

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Tech

AI disclosure required in campaign ads, FCC chair says

AI disclosure required in campaign ads, FCC chair says

Published

on

By

AI disclosure required in campaign ads, FCC chair says

U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel on Wednesday proposed requiring disclosure of content generated by artificial intelligence (AI) in political ads on radio and TV.

Rosenworcel is asking her colleagues to vote to advance a proposed rule that would require disclosure of AI content in both candidate and issue advertisements, but does not propose to prohibit any AI-generated content within political ads. 

The rule would require on-air and written disclosures and cover cable operators, satellite TV and radio providers, but the FCC does not have authority to regulate internet or social media ads or streaming services.

The agency has already taken steps to combat misleading use of AI in political robocalls.

Advertisement

There is growing concern in Washington that AI-generated content could mislead voters in the November presidential and congressional elections. Some senators want to pass legislation before November that would address AI threats to election integrity.

“As artificial intelligence tools become more accessible, the commission wants to make sure consumers are fully informed when the technology is used,” Rosenworcel said in a statement, adding the proposal “makes clear consumers have a right to know when AI tools are being used in the political ads they see.”

The FCC said the use of AI is expected to play a substantial role in 2024 political ads. She singled out the potential for misleading “deep fakes” which are “altered images, videos, or audio recordings that depict people doing or saying things that did not actually do or say, or events that did not actually occur.”

Advocacy group Public Knowledge called on Congress to extend oversight of AI in political advertising to digital platforms.

Requiring disclosure of AI “protects a vital public interest and is a commonsense step for preventing deceptive political advertisements,” the group’s policy counsel Nicholas Garcia said.

Advertisement

AI content in elections drew new attention in January after a fake robocall imitating President Joe Biden sought to dissuade people from voting for him in New Hampshire’s Democratic primary election.

In February, the FCC said robocalls using AI-generated voices are illegal. The declaratory ruling gave state attorneys general new tools to go after the entities behind the robocalls, Rosenworcel said.

The FCC in 2023 finalized a $5.1 million fine levied on conservative activists for making more than 1,100 illegal robocalls ahead of the 2020 U.S. election.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Tech

Meta’s Rayban integrates Instagram, Amazon Music, Calm App

Meta’s Rayban integrates Instagram, Amazon Music, Calm App

Published

on

By

Meta's Rayban integrates Instagram, Amazon Music, Calm App

 Meta has unveiled a series of updates to its Ray-Ban smart glasses, enhancing user experience with innovative hands-free functionalities.

These enhancements include seamless integration with popular platforms such as Instagram, Amazon Music, and the meditation app Calm.

One of the standout features of this update is the ability for users to effortlessly share images from their smart glasses directly to their Instagram Story without the need to reach for their phone.

Users can simply capture a photo with the smart glasses and command, “Hey Meta, share my last photo to Instagram,” or opt to take a new photo in the moment by saying, “Hey Meta, post a photo to Instagram.”

Advertisement

This move by Meta echoes the functionality introduced by Snap Spectacles in 2016, which allowed users to capture photos and videos with their smart glasses for direct sharing to Snapchat Stories.

Meta’s Ray-Ban smart glasses now offer hands-free integrations with Amazon Music and the Calm app. With voice commands like “Hey Meta, play Amazon Music,” users can enjoy streaming music without the need to handle their phone.

The Calm integration allows users to access mindfulness exercises and self-care content by simply saying, “Hey Meta, play the Daily Calm.”

Expanding its style offerings, Meta has introduced new designs in 15 countries, including the U.S., Canada, Australia, and parts of Europe.

Among these styles are Skyler in Shiny Chalky Gray with Gradient Cinnamon Pink Lenses, Skyler in Shiny Black with Transitions Cerulean Blue Lenses, and Headliner Low Bridge Fit in Shiny Black with Polar G15 Lenses. These glasses are available for purchase on both Meta’s and Ray-Ban’s websites.

Advertisement

The introduction of these new features comes on the heels of Meta’s AI upgrade to the smart glasses, which integrated multimodal AI capabilities.

This enhancement empowers users to interact with their environment more effectively, enabling features such as real-time translation using the built-in camera and Meta AI.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © GLOBAL TIMES PAKISTAN